Photo by: Derek Doar
Nottingham and Notts Photographic Society

Technical Information

Neutral Density Filter, Exposure Calculation Chart
(for using the 10x or 6x Neutral Density Filter)
(Click on the PDF logo to get the Exposure Calculation chart as a .pdf file.)

A Neutral Density (ND) filter like this B&W 110 ND is often needed if you want to experiment with long exposures, reducing the amount of light that passes through the lens to the sensor and allowing you to use slower shutter speeds in your shots. This slowing down of the shutter lets you capture the motion of flowing water, windswept grasses or clouds etc. as a blur, which can result in very creative images.

Using the B+W 110 N is quite an art – You have to compose and focus shots before adding the filter, as once it is on you can barely see anything through the viewfinder (With some cameras it can be left on if you use with Live View). If you fancy experimenting with really long exposures it's a fabulous tool, allowing you to use slow shutter speeds even in full daylight conditions. Very specific, but good fun!


PRODUCT
DESCRIPTION
WHERE TO BUY
Click for review and how to use
HITECH REVERSE ND GRAD

In contrast to the regular Neutral density grads where the graduation transition is from the top of the filter, the reverse grad offers the transition from dark to light from the middle of the filter (ie in reverse).

This is a benefit when shooting bright horizons to enable more control over the exposure and balance the foreground image.

The filters are available in 3 densities 0.3, 0.6, 0.9.


Adobe RGB (1998) vs ProPhoto RGB
By Derek Doar

For some years now, since the Digital Photography revolution began, photographers have been recommended to use Adobe RGB (1998) as their working color space.

Photographic technology has moved forward at an alarming rate and given us better cameras, monitors, printers and software.

Is it now the time to change to ProPhoto RGB?


Click to view article


An article on Color Space Conversion
on the Cambridge in Colour Website


An article on the Basics of Digital Camera Pixels
on the Cambridge in Colour Website

Adobe Camera Raw 6.1 User Guide
by Francesco Marzoli

This article was offered free by X-Rite.com.
Author of the first Camera Raw User’s Manual, winner of the Adobe YouGC Contest, Francesco works as
Photoshop consultant and teacher in courses, workshops and seminars. Francesco Marzoli became an Adobe Certified Expert in Photoshop and Beta Tester for X-Rite products.


Click to view article

This website contains some excellent technical tutorials.

Click on the image
to view the Website


RAW Update Compatibility Chart
Having trouble getting the RAW files from your camera to open in Photoshop or Elements?

Then check out this free PDF guide!

Load it up, find your camera make and model, then read across to see which version of Adobe Camera Raw you need and follow the tips on downloading and installing.

You’ll be up and running in no time!

(To download the compatibility chart as a .pdf file, click on the PDF logo)



Webinar Archive:
Beyond Monitor Calibration - Get Prints That Match Your Display!
One of the most frustrating things that can happen to any photographer is getting prints that don't look like the image that we saw on our monitor. Dark images, color shifts or just plain bad color are common results back from both desktop printers and labs when you don't have a Color Workflow for your system

Watch this FREE Webinar to see for yourself how to easily have your printed images match your display - every time!

Click on the image
to view the Webinar


NEW Video | X-Rite i1Display Pro
The X-Rite i1Display Pro is an exciting newly designed colorimeter making it the most advanced monitor and projector profiling hardware available.